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The Best and Worst Cars for Teenage Drivers

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If you think that larger cars are safer, you’re right. But what other qualities make for a safer car, particularly for teens? There is always some later, greater feature that supposed to make a big difference in vehicle safety. But most of us can’t buy new or expensive cars for our kids. What should we hone in on to pick the safest car within our budget?

If you’re one of those people who likes to check it out yourself, there are two reliable places you can go for safety ratings. The first, safercar.gov, is run by a federal agency, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. This is a good place to go for unbiased readings of vehicles. When you see ads on TV for cars that got a “5-star” safety rating, this is probably the rating.

Safercar.gov shows test results for two things: crashworthiness and rollovers. “Crashworthiness” means how well a car “protect its occupants in a crash.” Rollover safety means how structurally sound the car was in a rollover accident.

You can search by make, model, and year on this website. You can even enter a specific a vehicle identification number (VIN). And the website includes recalls, so you can see any known problems in cars, along with the manufacturers’ repairs. If you’re into videos, all of the crash tests are on YouTube.

Another great website for car research is the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS).  The IIHS also provides ratings, but it doesn’t just focus on crashworthiness. The IIHS also evaluates “crash avoidance and mitigation— technology that can prevent a crash or lessen its severity.”

If you’re not much on research and prefer to just cut to the chase, the IIHS also makes a list every year of the safest cars for teens. They make four recommendations for younger drivers:

  • Avoid powerful engines.
  • Stick with big, heavy cars.
  • Make sure you get electronic stability control (ESC).
  • Check the safety ratings.

The worst cars would omit all or some of these important safety features.

If you or a loved one were injured in an accident, you may be entitled to money damages. The attorneys at Gray Law Group, LLC are experienced Louisiana accident attorneys, and we’ll help you get the money you deserve. Contact us today for a free case review: (504) 264-5552.